Section 43A of The Banking Regulation Act, 1949: Preferential payments to depositors.

Section 43A of The Banking Regulation Act, 1949:

Preferential payments to depositors.

Preferential payments to depositors. – (1) In every proceeding for the winding up of a banking company where a winding up order has been made, whether before or after the commencement of the Banking Companies (Second Amendment) Act, 1960 (37 of 1960), within three months from the date of the winding up order or where the winding up order has been made before such commencement, within three months therefrom, the preferential payments referred to in section 530 of the Companies Act, 1956 (1 of 1956), in respect of which statements of claims have been sent within one month from the date of the service of the notice referred to in section 41-A, shall be made by the official liquidator or adequate provision for such payments shall be made by him.
(2) After the preferential payments as aforesaid have been made or adequate provision has been made in respect thereof, there shall be paid within the aforesaid period of three months-
(a) in the first place to every depositor in the savings bank account of the banking company a sum of two hundred and fifty rupees or the balance at his credit, whichever is less; and thereafter,

(b) in the next place, to every other depositor of the banking company a sum of two hundred and fifty rupees or the balance at his credit, whichever is less, in priority to all other debts from out of the remaining assets of the banking company available for payment to general creditors:

Provided that the sum total of the amounts paid under clause (a) and clause (b) to any one person who in his own name (and not jointly with any other person) is a depositor in the savings bank account of the banking company and also a depositor in any other account, shall not exceed the sum of two hundred and fifty rupees.
(3) Where within the aforesaid period of three months full payment cannot be made of the amounts required to be paid under clause (a) or clause (b) of sub-section (2) with the assets in cash, the official liquidator shall pay within that period to every depositor under clause (a) or, as the case may be, clause (b) of that sub-section on a pro rata basis so much of the amount due to the depositor under that clause as the official liquidator is able to pay with those assets; and shall pay the rest of that amount to every such depositor as and when sufficient assets are collected by the official liquidator in cash.
(4) After payments have been made first to depositors in the savings bank account and then to the other depositors in accordance with the foregoing provisions, the remaining assets of the banking company available for payment to general creditors shall be utilised for payment on a pro rata basis of the debts of the general creditors and of the further sums, if any, due to the depositors; and after making adequate provision for payment on a pro rata basis as aforesaid of the debts of the general creditors, the official liquidator shall, as and when the assets of the company are collected in cash, make payment on a pro rata basis as aforesaid, of the further sums, if any, which may remain due to the depositors referred to in clause (a) and clause (b) of sub-section (2).
(5) In order to enable the official liquidator to have in his custody or under his control in cash as much of the assets of the banking company as possible, the securities given to every secured creditor may be redeemed by the official liquidator-
(a) where the amount due to the creditor is more than the value of the securities as assessed by him or, as the case may be, as assessed by the official liquidator, on payment of such value; and

(b) where the amount due to the creditor is equal to or less than the value of the securities as so assessed, on payment of the amount due:

Provided that where the official liquidator is not satisfied with the valuation made by the creditor, he may apply to the High Court for making a valuation.
(6) When any claimant, creditor or depositor to whom any payment is to be made in accordance with [the provisions of this section], cannot be found or is not readily traceable, adequate provision shall be made by the official liquidator for such payment.
(7) For the purposes of this section, the payments specified in each of the following clauses shall be treated as payments of a different class, namely:-
(a) payments to preferential claimants under section 530 of the Companies Act, 1956 (1 of 1956);

(b) payments under clause (a) of sub-section (2) to the depositors in the savings bank account;

(c) payments under clause (b) of sub-section (2) to the other depositors;

(d) payments to the general creditors and payments to the depositors in addition to those specified in clause (a) and clause (b) of sub-section (2).

(8) The payments of each different class specified in sub-section (7) shall rank equally among themselves and be paid in full unless the assets are insufficient to meet them, in which case they shall abate in equal proportion.]
[(9) Nothing contained in sub-sections (2), (3), (4), (7) and (8) shall apply to a banking company in respect of the depositors of which the Deposit Insurance Corporation is liable under section 16 of the Deposit Insurance Corporation Act, 1961 (47 of 1961).
(10) After preferential payments referred to in sub-section (1) have been made or adequate provision has been made in respect thereof, the remaining assets of the banking company referred to in sub-section (9) available for payment to general creditors shall be utilised for payment on pro rata basis of the debts of the general creditors and of the sums due to the depositors:
Provided that where any amount in respect of any deposit is to be paid by the liquidator to the Deposit Insurance Corporation under section 21 of the Deposit Insurance Corporation Act, 1961 (47 of 1961), only the balance, if any, left after making the said payment shall be payable to the depositor.]

 

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